If the child seems to be using repetitive language because he is anxious or worried, set aside time to talk about his concerns...Come up with a reassuring phrase that addresses his concern, such as, “That’s only make-believe. It’s not real.” Crissey, Pat (2013-12-02). Teaching Communication Skills to Children with Autism (Kindle Locations 2094-2095). Attainment Company,... Continue Reading →

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Initiate Operation Smash Head against Wall

Since echolalia is often a result of not understanding, improving comprehension generally results in a decrease of echolalia. Location 2019 Two quotes ago, the author implied this, now the author is just blatantly stating it: "echolalia is often a result of not understanding."  Yeah, that's all I'm gonna say about.  I just can't believe how... Continue Reading →

In which we Must Silence their Speech

This [(echolalia caused by the person enjoying saying the phrase)] is best addressed by distracting the child, cueing her to be quiet (putting a finger to your lips), then quickly pointing out something that is of interest to her, like a favorite toy So, let's ignore and make sure that we get rid of this... Continue Reading →

Shame. Shame. Shame.

For all children, motivation is a factor in learning to speak. If a child never got anything in return for trying to communicate, his attempts would cease. Crissey, Pat (2013-12-02). Teaching Communication Skills to Children with Autism (Kindle Locations 408-409). Attainment Company, Inc.. Kindle Edition. So, if a kid doesn't learn to speak (which means... Continue Reading →

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